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Recording/Mixing/Arranging Techniques for Electric Guitars from Clean to Distortion and back
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anthonyvillena
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Joined: 07/02/2014 02:53:22
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Does anyone have any suggestions on where to start looking for techniques to record/mix/arrange electric guitar.

in parts of the song where the Guitar changes from a clean sounding to distortion, and adding effects, etc. it sounds real choppy when i am just tracking the guitar by it self,,, no drums, no metronome.. the transitions are really really choppy.

I have not added drums or bass yet... but i am wondering if it will disguise the changes from clean to distortion once i add the drums and bass. or is there some kind of fade in technique used...

kinda just looking for a place to start reading or watching some techniques used to blend the change in signal from clean to distortion and back.

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 02/04/2014 04:41:58

TimmyP1955
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I see this as an arrangement problem, not a recording problem.
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anthonyvillena
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TimmyP1955 wrote:I see this as an arrangement problem, not a recording problem.


I have updated the Topic title.....soooo do you have any ideas where to find info?
sirmonkey
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Are you using a stompbox for your effects? Or plugins? And can you post your track for some of us to hear? Also, DEFINITELY
watch the tutorials by a guy named JOHNNY GEIB. Just go to YouTube, and type in his name. He has many, many free tutorials which will get you very familiar with Studio One, recording, and mixing fast. Trust me, his videos are an excellent way of learning a whole bunch of stuff without having your head explode. Also, the titles of his tutorials are relevant to the subjects covered, which also helps.

Also, look up the terms "crossfades" , and "comping". "Comping" relate to recording several takes easily, so you can keep just the best parts of many takes. "Crossfading" is basically a way of blending one section of audio into another without an awkward & sudden change (like what you are describing.)

Anyway, I hope you post a clip we can hear. Good luck!
anthonyvillena
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sirmonkey wrote:Are you using a stompbox for your effects? Or plugins? And can you post your track for some of us to hear? Also, DEFINITELY
watch the tutorials by a guy named JOHNNY GEIB. Just go to YouTube, and type in his name. He has many, many free tutorials which will get you very familiar with Studio One, recording, and mixing fast. Trust me, his videos are an excellent way of learning a whole bunch of stuff without having your head explode. Also, the titles of his tutorials are relevant to the subjects covered, which also helps.

Also, look up the terms "crossfades" , and "comping". "Comping" relate to recording several takes easily, so you can keep just the best parts of many takes. "Crossfading" is basically a way of blending one section of audio into another without an awkward & sudden change (like what you are describing.)

Anyway, I hope you post a clip we can hear. Good luck!


Thanks for the tips. I will look it up and i will try and get a clip up ASAP. Busy a bit at the moment.
chrisatrational
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These are my go-to techniques - Use separate tracks for clean and distorted guitars. Double track the distorted guitar, and use parallel compression for the clean guitar.
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matthewgorman
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chrisatrational wrote:These are my go-to techniques - Use separate tracks for clean and distorted guitars. Double track the distorted guitar, and use parallel compression for the clean guitar.


Agreed on the separate tracks. Adding the rest of the instruments will mask to a degree, but separate tracks is my preferred method.
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Rock Johnson
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All of this means nothing without hearing the track and knowing what style of music it is.

F'rinstance, listen to this between 0:40 and 0:42: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRqW_fxsUYU

Hear how the volume swells up? WIth a good amp or modeler, when you back off the guitar volume, it will not only get quieter, but it will clean up as well. That's the old school way of doing it.

Compare and contrast to this between 2:13 and 2:15 - choppy transition from clean to distorted, but then at 2:26 the distorted guitar fades out and the clean comes back in. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WM8bTdBs-cw


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