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Terminology Explanation Please
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Kiwicomposer
Presonic
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Joined: 02/12/2011 15:38:39
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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Ok In Studio One you have 3 different terms which I have to be honest I don't totally understand the differences.
Well I sort of do, but would like a clear explanation if possible..

What is the "differences" between:
"Bit Depth"
"Processing Precision"
"Resolution"


As I said I sort of know some of the answers but a plain english explanation of the three would be helpful. I am hoping to use the answer to explain it to someone else.

Attached are some screen shots where these terms are used or shown.
They are from a single song..

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 11.28.46 am.png
[Thumb - Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 11.28.46 am.png]
 Description Example 2 [Disk] Download
 Filesize 80 Kbytes
 Downloaded:  251 time(s)

Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 11.28.57 am.png
[Thumb - Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 11.28.57 am.png]
 Description Example 1 [Disk] Download
 Filesize 92 Kbytes
 Downloaded:  282 time(s)

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 16/02/2014 23:33:35

Steve Currington
de Composer
Wellington, New Zealand
Twitter: @kiwicomposer
Facebook: kiwicomposer
SkypeID: kiwicomposer
----------------------------------------

Primary Hardware: Presonus Studio One v2.6.2, Presonus Audiobox1818vsl, Presonus Audiobox USB, Presonus Faderport, Focusrite Liquid Saffire 56, MOTU Traveler Mk3, TC-Helicon VoiceworksPlus, FMR RNC, FMR RNLA, Axiom Pro 49 Keyboard, other sundry hardware, numerous mics, audio plugins and instruments.
Primary Software: Sibelius v7.x, Notion v4.x, Logic Studio. V9.x., Melodyne Editor.

Running on iMac's and MacBookAir with OSX 10.9.x Mavericks

jemusic
Presonic
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Joined: 16/12/2010 14:14:20
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Well I can see why you are interested to know. There are after all three places where bit depth and resolutions are mentioned. I can give you my take on this anyway.

The top shot or first image shows 'Resolution' This is definitely what your recording or incoming resolution is going to be. If your audio interface can handle 24 bit which it should it is generally a good idea to select 24 bit here. It does mean all your session will be creating 24 bit files and in your final mastering stages you will need to dither this down to 16 bit at some point for a CD release. This is probably the most important setting of all three.

24 bit recording offers a much lower digital noise floor and hence you don't have to record so loud or hot. You can use 16 bit here for say less important things that you know are going to end up on a CD for example. Such as a voice over or somethiong that does not require 24 bit precision. Or a recording of a lecture or something like that.

In your second shot up the top is a field marked 'Process Precision'. This is normally 32 bit and what this means is what the background resolution is for the final mixing stages and other things ie behind the scenes processing. 24 bit files are being handled in 32 bit precision behind the scenes and will still only end up at 24 bit in the end. But higher behind the scenes process resolution allows for better quality and handling of digital audio.

You can set this to 64 bit precision if you like and even a 32 bit computer system can take advantage of a higher background processing resolution. It may put your computer under a slightly higher load. You are effectively doubling the process resolution behind the scenes now for even greater quality.

Now in your second shot lower down the 'Bit Depth' is set at 32 bit. To be honest I am not completely sure what this is all about either. I am on a 32 bit OS system and this value always stays at 32 bit no matter what I set anything else to. I think someone one who may know more might chime in here. I could be wrong but perhaps if you have a 64 bit OS then this may show 64 bit. As I don't I cannot say for sure.
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jpettit
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There is just really two things here. The first one should be labeled Bit Depth.
Precision as mentioned above is the bit depth of the internal mixing engine. When summing many 24 bit signals the sum can exceed 24 bits thus the need for 32 bit engine. Some files including bounces in S1 will be a 32 bit files. Thus the need for a 64 bit summing engine (precision) to handle sums/peak larger than 32 bits.
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jemusic
Presonic
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Does anyone know what the Bit Depth setting of 32 means on his second shot right down the bottom though. I am curious. As I said it never changes for me no matter what I do. Is it related to the OS system being 32 bit or 64 bit.

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Wilkesin
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Joined: 15/11/2011 17:00:44
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From what I understand it is theoretically impossible to clip a track/bus internally using a 64 bit ("Double Precison") audio engine (or mix path). This of course assumes the track was not clipped initially on recording/input (ie - externally). Part of making this possible when "transforming" tracks, to use the S1 terminology, is that the resulting file that is created is a 32 bit file. So if you recorded at 24 bit, did a bunch of mixing, added FX, and the meters were clipping when you transform/render the track you will get 32 bit file that is unclipped.

Try converting a virtual instrument part to audio then check the properties of the resulting file in the inspector. If you are using the 64 bit engine it should be a 32 bit file and whatever the project sampling rate is.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 17/02/2014 03:38:59

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jpettit
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jemusic wrote:Does anyone know what the Bit Depth setting of 32 means on his second shot right down the bottom though. I am curious. As I said it never changes for me no matter what I do. Is it related to the OS system being 32 bit or 64 bit.


Well I believe the first one is the bit depth of the files that get recorded by S1.

The later is a good questions
Manual says:
When the aforementioned settings are selected, your system’s current total input and
output latency, sample rate, and bit depth will be reported below the Audio Setup
menus.
In other words it is reporting what the audio interface driver is set to. Changing interfaces will change that number.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 17/02/2014 03:42:24

My Website
FRs: Tempo Detection & Mapping
Training Videos: Advance Melodyne, Creating Macros, 2.5 New Features, Signal Flow, Audio Timing Drum Replacement, Tempo Mapping, Useful Macros, Transformations, Layer/Takes/Comps
Simultaneous Audio Interfaces: Audiobox 1818VSL, RME 9632, Line 6 UX2, HF Presonus HP-60
DAWs: Studio One Pro 2.6.1, Reaper 4.5, Sonar X3c Pro, Adobe Audition CS5
Computer: OS:Win7 64-bit, Core i7 950, ASUS P6X58D Premium, 12GB DDR3 1600, GeForce GTX 470 (for CUDA) ,SSD Boot & Cache drives, 1 Tera 7200 RPM SATA II Audio & Video drives, UAD-2 x2
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jemusic
Presonic
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Joined: 16/12/2010 14:14:20
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Ok thanks jpettit for your help on this. Yes you are very correct. That last 'Bit Depth' setting on the OP bottom of shot two is referring to the actual audio interface that I am using. And that is the reason why it is always reporting 32 bit. because I never change that.

Although I have got a PCI card that normally would connect to an ADAT machine but instead it connects to my Yamaha digital mixer. Now the mixer only goes up to 24 bit. However the PCI card that is in the slot might be reporting 32 bit to Studio One which I suspect it is. I have just checked and that particular card has a built in 32 bit effects processor (which I never use) so that is I guess the reason it is reporting 32 bit in that window.

If I change this to the Internal sound card in my computer it switches over to 16 bit.
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Kiwicomposer
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FYI Here is a bunch of paragraphs I extracted from the manual.... Not all continuous just clipped from a couple of places..

======
Studio One features a cutting-edge high-precision mix engine. A mix engine is the “number cruncher” that does the mathematical summing required to mix multiple sources of digital audio.
Studio One employs a 32-/64-bit floating point, mixed-mode engine. This means that the audio engine can automatically switch between using 32-bit, single-precision floating point and 64-bit, double-precision floating-point math on the fly, depending on the capability of the plug-ins (VST/AU effects, etc.) inserted into the signal chain.

In Studio One/Options/Audio Setup (Mac OS X: Preferences/Options/Audio Setup), set Process Precision to Double (64-bit) to activate 64-bit processing. Otherwise, all processing will be done in single precision (32-bit).

Studio One will process audio as accurately as current technology allows, ensuring that your audio maintains the highest quality possible.

When using a Core Audio device, you will see a Device Block Size setting. The Device Block Size is the audio device’s buffer size, which has a direct impact on your audio device’s performance. You can increase or decrease the Device Block Size by sliding the horizontal fader left or right. The appropriate setting depends upon your specific use of Studio One. ?
In the Windows version of Studio One, Internal Block Size can be locked to the Device Block Size by checking the Lock box (checked by default). The Internal Block Size is the software buffer size, which will have a direct impact on your computer system and on Studio One’s performance.

If unlocked, the Internal Block Size can be selected from a drop-down menu. If you are unsure of the best setting, leave Internal Block Size locked to Device Block Size.

For hardware-driven effects and virtual instruments, such as the TC Electronic PowerCore and Universal Audio UAD card, locking the Internal Block Size of your Audio Device is critical to ensure proper operation.

By default, Studio One’s process precision is set at Single (32-bit). You may choose double precision (64-bit) from the Process Precision drop-down menu.

If your computer has multiple processors or processing cores, Enable Multi-Processing will be checked by default. Unless you experience performance issues, it is recommended you leave this at the default setting for best performance.

When the aforementioned settings are selected, your system’s current total input and output latency, sample rate, and bit depth will be reported below the Audio Setup menus.

===========
Steve Currington
de Composer
Wellington, New Zealand
Twitter: @kiwicomposer
Facebook: kiwicomposer
SkypeID: kiwicomposer
----------------------------------------

Primary Hardware: Presonus Studio One v2.6.2, Presonus Audiobox1818vsl, Presonus Audiobox USB, Presonus Faderport, Focusrite Liquid Saffire 56, MOTU Traveler Mk3, TC-Helicon VoiceworksPlus, FMR RNC, FMR RNLA, Axiom Pro 49 Keyboard, other sundry hardware, numerous mics, audio plugins and instruments.
Primary Software: Sibelius v7.x, Notion v4.x, Logic Studio. V9.x., Melodyne Editor.

Running on iMac's and MacBookAir with OSX 10.9.x Mavericks

hibidy
Presonoid

Joined: 01/02/2011 09:13:29
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jemusic wrote:Ok thanks jpettit for your help on this. Yes you are very correct. That last 'Bit Depth' setting on the OP bottom of shot two is referring to the actual audio interface that I am using. And that is the reason why it is always reporting 32 bit. because I never change that.

Although I have got a PCI card that normally would connect to an ADAT machine but instead it connects to my Yamaha digital mixer. Now the mixer only goes up to 24 bit. However the PCI card that is in the slot might be reporting 32 bit to Studio One which I suspect it is. I have just checked and that particular card has a built in 32 bit effects processor (which I never use) so that is I guess the reason it is reporting 32 bit in that window.

If I change this to the Internal sound card in my computer it switches over to 16 bit.


Great, now I gotta get a 64 bit sound card

New computer:

2.6.2/win7x64 ultimate/SSD os and library/i7 4770/16GB ram

Focusrite saffire 14/Novation impulse 49/tons of VST goodies

 
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