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Mic Positioning?
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god's lil rebel
Prenoob
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Joined: 28/12/2013 08:46:51
Messages: 5
Location: Oroville, Ca
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I use a Blue Bird mic with a Vox Guard, and the vocals sound OK but i feel they can sound better. Maybe place the mic upside down? I stand roughly 6-8 inches from the mic, which uses the original pop filter and also another one, about $70. My vocals sound as if I'm performing live, should I tone it down a bit? In what tone should you record? Should the live performance and vocal recording sound that much different? Also if somebody could lead me to a nice PLUGIN CHAIN, I have all Waves Plugins and also FabFilter! Here is a link to my music!
www.youtube.com/user/lomavistahoodlum/videos
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sps
Prenoob

Joined: 19/08/2011 21:01:04
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How about your recording studio? Acoustic measurements taken?
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Presonoid
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Joined: 01/08/2012 23:30:41
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If you are singing into the front of the mic and still get a lot of room sound, you need to reduce those early reflections. I have foam sound panels taped to my wall and use a large diaphram condenser mic. I sing about 3 inches from a pop filter that is about 2 inches from the mic.

Send up an example of what you are getting if you want.
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Presonoid
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Joined: 28/07/2010 23:56:13
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I'd like to hear a sample. The voxguard may be a help or a hinderance. The problem I see with the concept of that type of thing is that is a solid piece of plastic, and it forms a good reflector around the back of the mic (non-perforated, and a fairly hard/reflective material) -- can you say comb-filtering? Then they mitigate that by slapping on some foam, which does a fair job with some frequencies, but not all, and not uniformly -- and this protects the back and sides of the mic from other early reflections in the space? -- at least in theory. It certainly blocks/diffuses some of the direct energy of the singer before it ever gets to a reflection point, and that is of significant value. But where are the lions-share of the problematic reflections going to enter the picture? Not so much from the back side of the nearly universally used cardiod condenser -- that is as close close to null as you can get in the pickup pattern. I tend to pay as much (or more) attention to treating the surfaces above, behind, and to the sides of the singer, wherever possible. My guess is that you are recording in a smallish room with minimal treatments, and what you are hearing is the sound of the room putting the hurt on things. I tend to characterize it as the sound "hardening." (And the smaller the room, the less energy in the room is necessary to reach the critical point of the sound "hardening" on you.) If you don't have a lot to spend on fancy treatment options, there are some pretty simple/affordable things you can do to get started down the road of acoustic mitigation. When you start to hear the difference that even cheap/minimal interventions can make, it may make you want to open your wallet a little and get serious about improving the acoustics of your space. If I was using one of those types of acoustic shields, I'd want to know it had a perforated shell, with a multi-layer construction with 2-3 different acoustically absorbant materials in the sandwich, and I'd still want to be recording in a "good" room, a big room, or well-treated smaller room. I can definitely see where (at least on paper) it would be a helpful addition to other room treatments. Plugins will not take away or hide a bad sounding room, sorry to say. If you want something like a "foolproof" vocal chain, consider looking at some of Waves signature series vocal suites. Demo to see which one(s) suit your style/tastes best. In general, I like to craft vocal chains from the ground up using seperate plugins, but sometimes a starting point is useful. I don't tend to share chains (or advice on them) much because to me it is all about listening for what the material needs/wants -- if anything at all (often less is much more) -- and using the plugins to sculpt as needed. Really learn your way around all of your compressors/limiters (my personal favorite is Renaissance Vox), EQs, and reverbs.
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Presonoid
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Joined: 17/02/2011 01:10:03
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Good stuff!

Room treatment also allows you to have a little more distance between singer and mic. The 'live sound' you refer to is partially due to the necessity of close mic'ing on stage. Distance allows the vocal energy to blend better. (Compare it to sitting with your ear against a 3-way speaker. You'll hear the mids or the subs or the tweeter, but never a good blend. You need some distance).
god's lil rebel
Prenoob
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Joined: 28/12/2013 08:46:51
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Location: Oroville, Ca
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Here are the vocals UNEDITED! https://soundcloud.com/godslilrebel/unedited-vocals

Do these sound "muddy" or too close/far away from the mic? What is your opinion on what could possibly make the 1st take sound more "clean?"
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Palaios
Presonoid
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Joined: 29/07/2010 14:28:13
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Location: Kiihtelysvaara, Finland
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a) mic/channel has some sort of bass cut on

b) You need some maintenace for Your voice - something too tight on higher throat area/ roof of palate/and ot muscular tensionig on throat area itself

c) drop off pop filters - use long enough sharp object instead (I prefer pencils etc "adjustable" stuff) for right distance. Filters do have efeects on audio.
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crow
Presonic
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Joined: 10/02/2011 04:05:43
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Location: North Carolina
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we should do a track 2gather inbox me
LIFE IS A SCHOOL! SO TELL ME WHAT DID YOU LEARN?


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Presonoid
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Joined: 28/07/2010 23:56:13
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I hear a combination of close miking and a bit of the room creeping in. In your current setup, moving further from the mic will make it sound a bit more relaxed/less congested (less "live voice"-ish, but you'll start getting more of the room that you don't really want then, too. Try some easy interventions: put a big quilt, blanket, comforter, sleeping bag, etc. behind the singer, and wrap around sides somewhat if it is big enough to do so. Sing toward the acoustically "deadest" part of the room (or hang another sleeping bag in that direction to knock down at least some of the energy in the room), or the part that has the most irregularity to it. Put foam (and/or diffusers -- paper-based egg cartons are a home-brew favorite) in strategic reflection areas/on large, hard, flat surfaces especially. Do some experimentation and you might be surprised at how far some minimal interventions will go. There are certainly limits to what you can do on a budget, and a good room analysis follwed by proper treatments (the right combination and placement of bass-trapping, absorbtion, and diffusion is really the direction to move in if you are going to be doing some serious tracking there. Doing some internet reading on acoustic treatments for home-studios is a good place to start, and a good way to avoid spending more money than you need to (or spending it on the wrong things) is to really educate yourself on the subject as much as possible before you get started.
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OS 10.8.5;
A & H Qu-16, AB1818VSL, Alesis IO14 / IO26,
PreSonus S1 v2.6.2.25990, Boom Recorder 8.3.2

Studio Kit:
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robe1972
Prenoob
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Joined: 11/09/2013 10:35:00
Messages: 10
Location: Brescia (Italy)
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If you want to improve the quality of your voice you need to change the microphone.
Unfortunately there is no alternative ...! I'll say one that has spent a lot of money looking for miracles, but at the end, when I bought a good microphone everything is fixed.
Yours is a nice microphone, but if you want to increase the quality, you have to switch to a better microphone.
Akg c12 ...Akg The tube ....Peluso P67 ...Neumann U87. .... and why no Akg 414 old version. Then even the pre is very important ... but less of the microphone.
For the problem of live sensation, you must edit the voice track with the volume very very good...not compression..only volume. When the voice is very balanced insert a compressor or two compressor..or three compressor....not much strong...but what you want..!!!!
Ciao ciao

This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at 22/01/2014 09:15:56

Vahevahe
Presonic
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Joined: 16/12/2011 09:46:31
Messages: 226
Location: Los Angeles
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god's lil rebel wrote:I use a Blue Bird mic with a Vox Guard, and the vocals sound OK but i feel they can sound better. Maybe place the mic upside down? I stand roughly 6-8 inches from the mic, which uses the original pop filter and also another one, about $70. My vocals sound as if I'm performing live, should I tone it down a bit? In what tone should you record? Should the live performance and vocal recording sound that much different? Also if somebody could lead me to a nice PLUGIN CHAIN, I have all Waves Plugins and also FabFilter! Here is a link to my music!
www.youtube.com/user/lomavistahoodlum/videos



The only reason to put the mic upside down is if its a tube mic. Some tube mics generate enough heat from the tube and over time it damages the capsule. My general rule for distance is to do a "hang loose" sign with your hand and that should be a good distance. The mic should be be about 3-4 inches above your mouth and angle toward the mouth so when you sing your head is up. if you don't have an outboard compressor. Make sure you have vocal control. Back off the mic a little when you get loud. Get closer when you are soft. That is the best compressor! This way the plug in you add later won't have to work as hard.\

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 05/02/2014 23:43:10

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