image description


How do YOU gain stage in Studio One?
  Forum Index » Studio One General Discussion 
Author
Message
Vocalpoint
Presonic

Joined: 17/10/2011 16:49:28
Messages: 192
Location: Calgary, AB
Offline

NickWeiland wrote:everyone is talking about gainstaging in post production. but surely if you record properly you wont need to.


Exactly.

If you need to create macros and start applying band-aids like normalizing audio to get it to behave - there is something really wrong with how the audio is getting into S1 in the first place.

To me - there is no concept of gain staging whatsoever AFTER recording.

It's either gain staged (controlled) on the way in - or it ain't gain staged at all.

VP
[WWW]
jemusic
Presonic
[Avatar]

Joined: 16/12/2010 14:14:20
Messages: 286
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Offline

Correct gain staging exists in all stages of a production and can certainly be easily applied AFTER recording.

I do work mixing existing multi track sessions quite often. I start by checking the rms levels on the tracks that I import into Studio One. If I am working at a K system level eg K-14 then the recorded tracks will either egree with that level, be shy of that level by some amount or be over that level. I make adjustments accordingly. Either by using an editor program or trimming audio parts volume using the gain handles in the Events.

From there it is always much simpler then to maintain buss levels corrcetly and get a good mix (and perfect ref level) happening on a buss. Same goes for buses summing to the main stereo buss.

Correct gain staging can also be applied going in and out of any plugins you are using. RMS levels can be checked in many stages of a production.

The difference is with recording using correct gain staging is that you save some time because your tracks are already sitting on the K system reference level already because you have been careful in getting your levels right as you track.

Limiting your approach to good gain staging in recording only is limiting in its approach. It applies everywhere, well after recording. It applies in mastering too for example.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 09/06/2014 23:15:24

[WWW]
Vocalpoint
Presonic

Joined: 17/10/2011 16:49:28
Messages: 192
Location: Calgary, AB
Offline

jemusic wrote:I do work mixing existing multi track sessions quite often. I start by checking the rms levels on the tracks that I import into Studio One. If I am working at a K system level eg K-14 then the recorded tracks will either egree with that level, be shy of that level by some amount or be over that level. I make adjustments accordingly. Either by using an editor program or trimming audio parts volume using the gain handles in the Events.


Well - if you are having to deal with getting somebody else's mess to play nice in the DAW - then you are in "fix" mode - rather than gain staging mode (To me) at that point.

And if you are making any attempt to actually alter the original audio as well (editor/trimming etc) you are now in full blown edit mode (again - to me)

Depending on your mindset - the "term" could certainly be applied across different processes during the session. But "Gain staging" in it's purest form (to me) is a pure level set exercise and nothing more - prior to that red light going solid and has nothing to do with any processes that involve "fixing" or "editing" something that has already been laid down.

But if you want to think of it that way - rock on

VP

This message was edited 3 times. Last update was at 09/06/2014 23:53:40

[WWW]
jemusic
Presonic
[Avatar]

Joined: 16/12/2010 14:14:20
Messages: 286
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Offline

You are certainly correct in that getting everything right at the source definitely goes a log way to easier gain staging later on.

Not only tracking but turning midi tracks driving VST instruments into audio is also another very important area. I have found some wildly swinging levels coming from some VST's. Some very soft, others way loud etc..

The same applies to loops as well. They need to be checked and adjusted accordingly to suit reference levels.

Trouble is people don't think about reference levels or any form of system calibration either. Without which I think it is near impossible to get correct gain staging happening.

Peak metering can be of very limited use in most DAW's. You need both peak and rms metering everywhere and a system approach of ref levels and calibration. Once you get into this you will always achieve perfect mixes that are at perfect levels everywhere in your signal flow from the tracks right throught to the final stereo buss OUT.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at 10/06/2014 00:39:32

[WWW]
Vocalpoint
Presonic

Joined: 17/10/2011 16:49:28
Messages: 192
Location: Calgary, AB
Offline

jemusic wrote:Trouble is people don't think about reference levels or any form of system calibration either. Without which I think it is near impossible to get correct gain staging happening.


So true. I still get a giggle out of users of all DAWs (even S1) who pop onto forums and wonder why they can't mix a track when all the pieces are sitting at unity and all tracks are way above the red line (0.0dbFS).

And then to fix it - they bring down the master fader until the entire mess is hovering around 0.00001 dbFS.

Oh well.

VP
[WWW]
 
Forum Index » Studio One General Discussion
Go to: